June 1988

Voice of the Uprising ‒ Toby Shelley

June 10, 1988

Survey of communiques issued by the leadership of the Palestinian uprising [intifada]: from the degree of popular adherence to the urgings and appeals contained in these documents, it is clear that they are the authentic voice of the masses. Their power, and that of their authors, lies not only in their ability to speak in the name of the PLO and (latterly) to reiterate its positions, but ‒ more crucially ‒ in their intimate connection with the stone-thrower and the striker, a connection embodied in the local Popular Committees.

Appeals by Palestinian Women

June 10, 1988

Palestinian women have played a leading role in the demonstrations, not fearing death but crying out: “Victory or martyrdom, but no to the occupation”. At the same time, women have organized them­selves in relief committees to help the people who suffer during the uprising. They have also put themselves to danger by trying to rescue youths who are being beaten up by Israeli soldiers. As all other Palestinians, Palestinian women have been subjected to beating, imprisonment and martyrdom.

Yesh Gvul Appeal

June 10, 1988

In Hebrew, yesh gvul means “there is a limit”; it also means “there is a border”. A protest group by this name came into being in Israel following the 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon. Its members pledged themselves to refuse to do military service in Lebanon. More recently, during the Palestinian uprising in the occupied territories, the group extended its pledge and it now covers refusal to take part in the Israeli repressions in those territories.

‘Ad-Kan Appeal

June 10, 1988

This letter is on behalf of an organization of faculty members at Tel Aviv University called ‘Ad-Kan (“No Morel”), an ad hoc group formed in response to the extreme gravity of the situation in the occupied territories. While the members of ‘Ad-Kan hold diverse political views, they are united in their commitment to bring an end to the occupation through negotiations with the Palestinians on the basis of mutual recognition and equality.